Dictionary

Remoulade

Remoulade sauce, invented at the Burgundian court, originally used in French cuisine as a dip for celery. Currently, it has already migrated to other European countries (primarily Scandinavia), and even overseas, hence became a much more universal sauce. Outside France, it is also popular in Denmark, with finely chopped pickled cucumber and roasted onions, it is added to Smorrebrod, i.e. roasted beef sandwich, and also for the fish. In Iceland, it is a condiment commonly served on hot dogs, together with mustard, ketchup, and raw and fried onions.

Traditional Creole remoulade often contains paprika and tends to have a tannish or pink tint due to the use of Creole brown mustard like Zatarain’s, small amounts of ketchup, cayenne pepper, and paprika.  Creole remoulade taste is usually enriched by adding herbs, celery and onions, and the flavour is enriched with lemon juice, wine vinegar and Worcestershire sauce. It is usually served with the is used on shrimp, crabs, fried calamari, artichokes, and fried green tomatoes among other foods. In the United States, it is often used for roasted beef.

Ingredients for classic French Remoulade sauce:

  • a spoon of mustard
  • a spoonful of wine vinegar
  • a glass of oil
  • two hard-boiled eggs
  • raw egg yolk
  • a teaspoon of chopped parsley