Dictionary

Black garlic

Black garlic is a type of aged garlic whose browning is attributable to specific reaction rather than caramelization, first used as a food ingredient in Asian cuisine. It is treated in a special furnace, where the reaction occurs under the influence of heat. This reaction is called Maillard’s reaction, and the whole process lasts up to 90 days. It is she who makes the white, firm teeth become sticky, soft and even black. In this form, they do not lose their properties, on the contrary: active substances and minerals become more easily absorbed. In antiquity, people believed that black garlic prolonged life. They have even suggested that his regular consumption is a recipe for immortality. Black garlic is very popular in Korea and Thailand. Local chefs use black garlic to prepare many dishes. It is also very popular in the United States.

It slowly enters the European market. Most of the beneficial properties of black garlic result from the high content of antioxidants in its composition. Besides, it has several times more pro-health properties than known white garlic. Black garlic is a source of 18 amino acids, including eight essential, vitamin B and C. Its important ingredient is allicin, which strongly supports the human immune system, and also has a beneficial effect on the regulation of blood pressure. Allicin removes excess lipids and reduces the level of bad cholesterol, so black garlic is an essential component of the diet in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Best time to eat black garlic is in the morning. Some people consider this product as natural energy that stimulates the body, so it is better not to reach for it before bedtime.

Not only the advocates of natural products but also the chefs look closely at him. Chefs add it to sauces, dips and salads. It goes well with coriander, and sesame seeds also complement the taste of seafood and chicken. Some also add it to marinades. As black garlic has a slightly sticky form, it is easy to grease the toasts.